Ellen G. White Writings

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Christian Education, Page 83

Then we shall rightly understand the teaching of God’s word, and esteem the truth as the most valuable treasure with which to store the mind. We shall have a constant well-spring of the waters of life. We shall pray as did the psalmist, “Open thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things out of thy law,” [Psalm 119:18.] and shall find as he did that “the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether. More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold: sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb. Moreover by them is they servant warned: and in keeping of them there is great reward.” [Psalm 119:9-11.]—The Review and Herald, November 24, 1891.

Chapter 10—The Science of Salvation the First of Sciences

The schools established among us are matters of grave responsibility; for important interests are involved. In a special manner our schools are a spectacle unto angels and to men. A knowledge of science of all kinds is power, and it is in the purpose of God that advanced science shall be taught in our schools as a preparation for the work that is to precede the closing scenes of earth’s history. The truth is to go to the remotest bounds of the earth, through agents trained for the work. But while the knowledge of science is a power, the knowledge which Jesus in person come to impart to the world was the knowledge of the gospel. The light of truth was to flash its bright rays into the uttermost parts of the earth, and the acceptance or rejection of the message of God involved the eternal destiny of souls.

The plan of salvation had its place in the counsels of the Infinite from all eternity. The gospel is the

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